Ljubljana predicted to be the world's fastest-warming city

Ljubljana predicted to be the world's fastest-warming city

STA, July 12, 2019 - Ljubljana, a city located at the meeting point of two climate zones most affected by global warming - the northern Mediterranean and the Alpine region - is set to become the world's fastest-warming city, according to the Crowther Lab.

According to the forecast, the temperature in the Slovenian capital will rise by 8 degrees during the warmest month of the year by 2050, while the annual average temperature is expected to rise by 3.5 degrees.

Central Europe and the Balkans are expected to experience the highest temperature rises, so the climate in the region should resemble that of Texas, US, the study said.

Climatologist Aljoša Slameršak said Crowther Lab's forecasts are very similar to those of the Slovenian Environment Agency last year. The estimate for Ljubljana's hottest month may be somewhat more drastic, but not impossible, Slamershek told Dnevnik.

"We have to take into account the climatology of cities, which is different from the climatology of the wider area. With the concentration of unnatural surfaces, we get the effect of heat island in cities," he explained.

Among the 520 cities surveyed by the Crowther Lab, Ljubljana is expected to experience the highest increases in average temperatures during the summer months. A quarter of cities are predicted to see drastic changes.

Slovenia's capital is so badly affected by global warming, as Slovenia is the meeting point of the two climate zones most affected by global warming - the northern Mediterranean and the Alpine region.

That means more rain, more dry weather and higher than average temperatures, Slamershek told Dnevnik, adding that at temperatures up to 40 degrees, up to three long heat waves become common in summer.

The Crowther Lab made its predictions based on the assumption that countries would not fully implement the Paris Climate Agreement, and climatologists insist that such scenarios can still be avoided by immediate and radical action.

"The bad news is that Slovenia cannot influence climate change individually by reducing its emissions. We are largely dependent on European climate policy," Slamershek said.